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Todd serves as chair of the Energy Enforcement practice group. He represents energy clients with enforcement and compliance matters involving the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and other regulators, as well as related government and private litigation.

Over the past year, there have been major Federal Energy Regulatory Commission developments as more cases moved from the agency to adjudication in the courts. McGuireWoods’ update to its innovative FERC Enforcement Reporter — led by lawyer Carrie Mobley — organizes energy enforcement cases from 2005 to present by topic and presents the information in

On Oct. 19, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission issued a notice of proposed rulemaking to modify filing processes for electronic quarterly reports and revise and eliminate a number of data fields and definitions. Read on for an overview of the proposed changes and implications for EQR filers.

With an “alert” issued June 20, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission is targeting carbon markets by asking whistleblowers to come forward with information about fraudulent or manipulative trading of carbon credits and other environmental commodities as well as related derivatives.

Read on for details about the CFTC’s alert and implications for entities that trade in

Recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions letting federal courts hear constitutional challenges to enforcement proceedings at federal agencies opened the door to similar challenges to in-house enforcement proceedings at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), McGuireWoods Washington, D.C., partner Todd Mullins and associate Emily Song wrote in Law360.Continue Reading High Court Opens Door to Suits Against FERC, McGuireWoods Attorneys Write in Law360

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Office of Enforcement (OE) has historically focused on four “priorities,” as described in its annual Report on Enforcement. Those four priorities included (1) fraud and market manipulation; (2) serious violations of Reliability Standards; (3) anticompetitive conduct; and (4) conduct that threatens the transparency of regulated markets. In the 2021